Burkina Brandenburg Komplex (2018)

The film is a geographic construct in accordance with „our“ collective perception of Africa and the image of Africa presented by the media. Inaccuracies within this construct challenge these perceptions.
The setting is an African village apparently inhabited by Germans (or Brandenburg one hundred years from now) and a seemingly African mine, in which a Ferrari® is discovered during an excavation, like an archeological artifact.

Additionally, western consumer goods (Red Bull®, Nike®, Raffaello®), archaic agricultural products (coffee, milk) and wildlife (zebras, hyenas, budgies), with possible connotations with Africa and Germany as well as black/white are interwoven with the narrative, increasingly blurring dividing lines and stereotypes.

Within this village setting, we encounter the protagonist, “Joachim”, as he is trying to procure energy carriers, taken from the village environment, for a mysterious shaman (with one black and one white hand), in order to realize their vision, “The Collective Energy Project”.

A Museum for Prussian Culture serves as some kind of nexus within the village, harboring seemingly characteristic features of “German Culture” (ears of wheat, blackbirds) as well as artifacts of western consumer culture (WD 40, a Siemens hand mixer). The museum’s curator, a black woman, seems to be the only person who is keeping the Prussian epoch alive.

As the energy production reaches its climax and our protagonist Joachim is banned from attending the ceremony, he resorts to a kind of displacement activity, stealing the village’s energy liquid and using it to fuel the freshly restored Ferrari®, gloriously catapulting himself at full speed out of the story/history.

Whether the story takes place in a fictitious future, in the present or in the past remains unclear. There are hints referring to all three temporal stages, establishing a connection between historic references and medial realities.

BIRDS (2014)

A mesmerizing Hitchcockian visual study in ornithology, BIRDS, by visual artist Ulu Braun. breaks down societal construction, hinting at a dormant danger: he observes Earth’s winged inhabitants from up close, looking at their ominous and omniscient presence that watches over us in quiet surveillance. Associative editing brings out the sinuous elegance of the creatures, placing them against the glamour and refuse of cities shaped by human civilization. A cohabitation of prehistoric lineage estranged by an abstract soundtrack, this unlikely pairing of fowl and man becomes a premonitory reminder of the fallacy of modern civilization’s progress.
Andrei Tanasescu, Bucarest

Fish Soup (2005)

Mankind history shows that even abstruse ideas like the building of pyramids and moon expeditions are realizable and afterwards admired and mystifyed. The extent, the overcoming of normal physical borders and the inexplicability of the procedure are playing a large role in that. Fish Soup describes similiar to a recipe the video the preparation of the mediteranian Sea into a dish.
Fish Soup is Ulu Brauns very first video collage /hybrid video, that he realized together with Alexej Tchernyi. It was based on a „recipe“-idea of Tchernyi and initiated by Ulu Braun and his vision of hybrid cinema in 2002. As those methods were rather new, and computers and skills still slow, it took a while that „Fish Soup“ could be finished in 2005.