Frei Zeit (2019)

Wohlfühloasen, Erlebniswelten und Rastplätze. In der westlichen Gesellschaft hängen große Erwartungen am Nutzen der „freien“ Zeit. Es ist ein Erlösungsversprechen, welches sich aus der Arbeitsleistung speist. Der Filmessay „Frei Zeit“ untersucht in meist statischen Einstellungen, wie sich dieses Konstrukt an öffentlichen, privaten und medialen Räumen darstellt und welches Konfliktpotential entsteht, wenn Träume mit der Realität kollidieren. Metaphorisch stellt sich die Frage: Wie wollen wir leben?

Wellness oases, adventure worlds and resting places. In western society, great expectations are attached to the benefits of “free” time. It is a promise of salvation, which feeds on the work performance. The film essay “Frei Zeit” examines how this construct presents itself in public, private and media spaces and what potential for conflict arises when dreams collide with reality. Metaphorically, the question arises: how do you want to live?

 

Cadavres Exquis Vivants (since 2008)

Living Cadavres?

The otherwise proud and headstrong Katherine Hepburn gazes, close to tears and awaiting salvation, at her existence carved in stone. Bewitched into filling up in a coffee maker in a repetitive ritual, the lit fuse only seconds away from explosion. Franz von Assisi, who speaks to the animals, is a coarse guy here, who drivels while feeding a little golden bird, his fidgety lower regions meanwhile attempting to keep a globe rotating in a bonbonnière. The viewer is not really convinced by the butcher boy’s tenderness towards this delicate creature and is left with a sense of foreboding. Or Felix Mendelssohn, the exceptional composer who converted to Christianity, who is here portrayed as a provocative ruffian with the head of a sun-god and the feet of a crab. Back home at the dinner table he provokes a middle-class farce by affronting his mother with his exposed genitals. He does so, as is suggested by the voice-over, in order to finally begin his own life and to impress his sweetheart’s or sister.

Burkina Brandenburg Komplex (2018)

The film is a geographic construct in accordance with „our“ collective perception of Africa and the image of Africa presented by the media. Inaccuracies within this construct challenge these perceptions.
The setting is an African village apparently inhabited by Germans (or Brandenburg one hundred years from now) and a seemingly African mine, in which a Ferrari® is discovered during an excavation, like an archeological artifact.

Additionally, western consumer goods (Red Bull®, Nike®, Raffaello®), archaic agricultural products (coffee, milk) and wildlife (zebras, hyenas, budgies), with possible connotations with Africa and Germany as well as black/white are interwoven with the narrative, increasingly blurring dividing lines and stereotypes.

Within this village setting, we encounter the protagonist, “Joachim”, as he is trying to procure energy carriers, taken from the village environment, for a mysterious shaman (with one black and one white hand), in order to realize their vision, “The Collective Energy Project”.

A Museum for Prussian Culture serves as some kind of nexus within the village, harboring seemingly characteristic features of “German Culture” (ears of wheat, blackbirds) as well as artifacts of western consumer culture (WD 40, a Siemens hand mixer). The museum’s curator, a black woman, seems to be the only person who is keeping the Prussian epoch alive.

As the energy production reaches its climax and our protagonist Joachim is banned from attending the ceremony, he resorts to a kind of displacement activity, stealing the village’s energy liquid and using it to fuel the freshly restored Ferrari®, gloriously catapulting himself at full speed out of the story/history.

Whether the story takes place in a fictitious future, in the present or in the past remains unclear. There are hints referring to all three temporal stages, establishing a connection between historic references and medial realities.

Die Herberge (2017)

An einem Ort, der biblische Landschaft und westliche Mythen vereint, steht ein Gebäude – halb Rockerkneipe, halb Bergbauernhof. In dieser Herberge werden alle Wesen aufgenommen, die dieses unwirtliche Land durchqueren. “Die Herberge” ist ein Videogemälde, in dem Vergangenheit und Zukunft zu einem Ort verschmelzen und tiefste Nöte und Freizeitgestaltung einander nicht ausschließen.  Hier kreuzen sich unsere Wege.


In a place where a biblical landscape and western myths converge, there is a house, part biker hangout, part mountain farm. It welcomes all beings who traverse this inhospitable landscape. In „The Hostel“, past and future merge into one place, and deepest misery and recreation are not mutually exclusive. This is where our paths cross.

 

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Cave TV (2017)


Cave TV: relief projection corpus (150 x 100 x 30cm) + video (31:49, HD, sound), unique work

Cave TV is a video collage projected on a sculptural corpus with a relief-like surface. The video installation reconstructs the social situation similar to a primal campfire or a modern television set-up. Its collaged images are referring to genres, epoches and styles in media history. Refracting media echoes meander on the video sculpture and hypnotize their audience through vivid and ductile projection and shapes. An archaic ritual that questions the gravity of light and darkness.

“It is like a primal campfire that draws the viewer into contemplation on existence within his medial representation.” David L.

Architektura (2015)

Rather than reinventing the wheel, Ulu Braun re-envisions the structural potentiality of the brick, in this revisionist fable of mankind’s urbanization of our planet. Employing playful and visually dense digital collages, Braun’s associative tableaux collate an ‘alternate’ vision of our world, where nature invades the urban (and vice-versa). We’re transported by a comforting narrator through post-apocalyptic, post-capitalist habitats, where the material co-exists with the metaphysical, the literal alongside the figurative (soap-bubble buildings stand alongside ruined churches turned car dealerships). Architektura echoes our civilization’s childlike ingenuity in creation and destruction, as we question the inheritance we pass on to our future generations. (Andrei Tănăsescu, Bucharest)

Vertikale (2013)

VERTIKALE takes us up and away into a hyper-real world of appropriated TV and documentary imagery. This video-collage physically engages the viewer as vertical film shots are merged and mounted to mediate a symbolic journey from the depths of the sea to the peaks of human civilization. Life and the ambition to survive are reflected along a geographical and media-referential line.

Tower of Invincibility (2012)

Tower of Invincibility is a film installation created in a neo-melodramatic style about the advancement of an esoteric health and sports camp in the early 20th century. The camera follows the protagonists during their daily routines: weight lifting, acrobatics, telepathy, leisure time and witnesses how they are progressing from day to day. The filming took place at the Teufelsberg, a former listening station during the Cold War in Berlin. In 2008 the Maharishi Foundation, along with Director David Lynch, bought the terrain for building a 50-meter tall “Tower of Invincibility‚ and a “Vedic University of Peace‚.

Die Flutung von Viktoria (2004)

The Flooding of the Viktoria Plains is an expressiv fictional scenario withing miniature settings. It tells about a bus journey back to our origins. The young Ed Henkel is guiding tourists through the Victoria Plains before they are flooded forever. During the bus trip one of the travellers discovers his primeval longing for water.