Burkina Brandenburg Komplex (2018)

The film is a geographic construct in accordance with „our“ collective perception of Africa and the image of Africa presented by the media. Inaccuracies within this construct challenge these perceptions.
The setting is an African village apparently inhabited by Germans (or Brandenburg one hundred years from now) and a seemingly African mine, in which a Ferrari® is discovered during an excavation, like an archeological artifact.

Additionally, western consumer goods (Red Bull®, Nike®, Raffaello®), archaic agricultural products (coffee, milk) and wildlife (zebras, hyenas, budgies), with possible connotations with Africa and Germany as well as black/white are interwoven with the narrative, increasingly blurring dividing lines and stereotypes.

Within this village setting, we encounter the protagonist, “Joachim”, as he is trying to procure energy carriers, taken from the village environment, for a mysterious shaman (with one black and one white hand), in order to realize their vision, “The Collective Energy Project”.

A Museum for Prussian Culture serves as some kind of nexus within the village, harboring seemingly characteristic features of “German Culture” (ears of wheat, blackbirds) as well as artifacts of western consumer culture (WD 40, a Siemens hand mixer). The museum’s curator, a black woman, seems to be the only person who is keeping the Prussian epoch alive.

As the energy production reaches its climax and our protagonist Joachim is banned from attending the ceremony, he resorts to a kind of displacement activity, stealing the village’s energy liquid and using it to fuel the freshly restored Ferrari®, gloriously catapulting himself at full speed out of the story/history.

Whether the story takes place in a fictitious future, in the present or in the past remains unclear. There are hints referring to all three temporal stages, establishing a connection between historic references and medial realities.

Architektura (2015)

Rather than reinventing the wheel, Ulu Braun re-envisions the structural potentiality of the brick, in this revisionist fable of mankind’s urbanization of our planet. Employing playful and visually dense digital collages, Braun’s associative tableaux collate an ‘alternate’ vision of our world, where nature invades the urban (and vice-versa). We’re transported by a comforting narrator through post-apocalyptic, post-capitalist habitats, where the material co-exists with the metaphysical, the literal alongside the figurative (soap-bubble buildings stand alongside ruined churches turned car dealerships). Architektura echoes our civilization’s childlike ingenuity in creation and destruction, as we question the inheritance we pass on to our future generations. (Andrei Tănăsescu, BIEFF)

Vertikale (2013)

VERTIKALE takes us up and away into a hyper-real world of appropriated TV and documentary imagery. This video-collage physically engages the viewer as vertical film shots are merged and mounted to mediate a symbolic journey from the depths of the sea to the peaks of human civilization. Life and the ambition to survive are reflected along a geographical and media-referential line.

Plantheon (2016)

Every body’s life is a private research-center of happiness, sorrow and pain.‚¨Our film presents Teuri’s one. Plantheon is an intimate and experimental portrait of the Finnish artist Teuri Haarla, and focuses on his wholistic methods dealing with infancy trauma and social pressures. The film accompanies him while building a tower, making his ego-melting rituals, reflecting religion and philosopy, keeping balance with family. ‚¨“Lets just say that after childhood I needed some rest‚. ‚¨The film arose from the friendship between Ulu Braun and Haarla, which allowed a spontaneous and artistic co-operation of documentation.

FORST (2013)

The narrative videocollage FORST spans an arc from a primeval forest saturated in mysticism to the mediatized nature theme park. Athletes pave their way through the thicket of the forest. Hikers and nature lovers indulge in their bodies, while children are under the magic spell of mythical creatures. An ecstatic passion-play about nature, power and your own decomposition.

Maria Theresia and her 16 Children (2011)

History is made everyday, in reality as well as with every attempt to narrate it. The same is true for the artist team BitteBitteJaJa, where fact and fiction are mutually dependent. Digitally modified film material ‚“ ads, historical images, madness ‚“ are intertwined in a vortex of historical associations and compiled to create a new coherent flow of history. The content is shaped by 16 portraits of Maria Theresia’s children and a utopian view of a distant Austrian future.

Die Flutung von Viktoria (2004)

The Flooding of the Viktoria Plains is an expressiv fictional scenario withing miniature settings. It tells about a bus journey back to our origins. The young Ed Henkel is guiding tourists through the Victoria Plains before they are flooded forever. During the bus trip one of the travellers discovers his primeval longing for water.

Fish Soup (2005)

Mankind history shows that even abstruse ideas like the building of pyramids and moon expeditions are realizable and afterwards admired and mystifyed. The extent, the overcoming of normal physical borders and the inexplicability of the procedure are playing a large role in that. Fish Soup describes similiar to a recipe the video the preparation of the mediteranian Sea into a dish.
Fish Soup is Ulu Brauns very first video collage /hybrid video, that he realized together with Alexej Tchernyi. It was based on a “recipe”-idea of Tchernyi and initiated by Ulu Braun and his vision of hybrid cinema in 2002. As those methods were rather new, and computers and skills still slow, it took a while that “Fish Soup” could be finished in 2005.