Architektura (2015)

Rather than reinventing the wheel, Ulu Braun re-envisions the structural potentiality of the brick, in this revisionist fable of mankind’s urbanization of our planet. Employing playful and visually dense digital collages, Braun’s associative tableaux collate an ‘alternate’ vision of our world, where nature invades the urban (and vice-versa). We’re transported by a comforting narrator through post-apocalyptic, post-capitalist habitats, where the material co-exists with the metaphysical, the literal alongside the figurative (soap-bubble buildings stand alongside ruined churches turned car dealerships). Architektura echoes our civilization’s childlike ingenuity in creation and destruction, as we question the inheritance we pass on to our future generations. (Andrei Tănăsescu, BIEFF)

Vertikale (2013)

VERTIKALE takes us up and away into a hyper-real world of appropriated TV and documentary imagery. This video-collage physically engages the viewer as vertical film shots are merged and mounted to mediate a symbolic journey from the depths of the sea to the peaks of human civilization. Life and the ambition to survive are reflected along a geographical and media-referential line.

FORST (2013)

The narrative videocollage FORST spans an arc from a primeval forest saturated in mysticism to the mediatized nature theme park. Athletes pave their way through the thicket of the forest. Hikers and nature lovers indulge in their bodies, while children are under the magic spell of mythical creatures. An ecstatic passion-play about nature, power and your own decomposition.

Maria Theresia and her 16 Children (2011)

History is made everyday, in reality as well as with every attempt to narrate it. The same is true for the artist team BitteBitteJaJa, where fact and fiction are mutually dependent. Digitally modified film material ‚“ ads, historical images, madness ‚“ are intertwined in a vortex of historical associations and compiled to create a new coherent flow of history. The content is shaped by 16 portraits of Maria Theresia’s children and a utopian view of a distant Austrian future.